June 17th, 2014, 8:10 pm

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308-No fluent Vietnamese allowed

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daviddoesntgetit June 17th, 2014, 8:20 pm

Amy's been asking me to co-parent, in her words. Ever since I've been talking about it, she's been extremely on board with the idea, trying to get me to help her out which I'm pretty sure is comprised completely of ulterior motive.

I've been trying my best to teach Ngoc some Vietnamese, but it's difficult when my grasp of the language is, at best, tenuous. Since I never really read or spoke Vietnamese in an academic setting, my vocabulary is limited to everyday life. My Vietnamese gets better when I've been to Vietnam and it got extremely terrible in college when I just wasn't around the language as much as I used to be. It got better the more I got to see Bernard as he speaks it more than I do.

Amy was thinking of Vietnamese school for Ngoc but learned from her own family that the retention is kinda low.

Connor and Miriam have an American accent and they tend to throw more English in there than Bernard and I do.

Ngoc's been copying her mom's accent, which is pretty warped, which is why Amy is trying to have me hang out so often.

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roxjey June 17th, 2014, 8:36 pm

Cuanto lenguaje, hombre.

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Reealt June 17th, 2014, 10:24 pm

Haha, sounds like a fun time around. Maybe she could try some free online classes if she wants Ngoc to learn more formal Vietnamese, while learning more basic and casual Vietnamese from you and sort of her mom?

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Sir June 18th, 2014, 2:36 am

I wonder how it'll be for Ngoc when she gets to school. (Is she in school yet?)

My father was originally from Germany and came to the US when he was a teenager and eventually learned English but he has a permanent accent.

As kids, my siblings and I picked it up, so socially we had a couple of problems with other kids. My brother adapted and lost it very quickly.

I remember even later in high school somebody would ask where I was from, haha. I didn't sound like a local... They would always guess England instead of Germany though. I think I overcompensated for the accent when I was younger, and tried too hard to vocalize 'properly'.

I hope Ngoc has a better run of it though. Hey, and some Vietnamese is better than none! My little cousin can speak better German than I. Mine's pretty broken. (My folks thought learning English was more important.) Good luck, Teach!

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daviddoesntgetit June 20th, 2014, 8:29 pm

@Reealt: The kid's 3 so that's not happening.

It's not a big deal if she doesn't, Ngoc would just prefer it but it's not like she's gonna grow up any worse for the wear. For example, Amy can't speak it and she's a perfectly fine person.

@Sir: She's too young to be in school.

She's probably be fine. I spent my first day in school going around talking to all the kids in Vietnamese, growing up in the house, I just thought that was how the world spoke.

Our family had to make us watch a ton of TV after that so we could get used to speaking English in school.

I wasn't traumatized or anything by the event, I just think it's sort of funny.

Huh, really? I'm kinda curious what your accent is like now. Thanks, I've got her to learn to say her age and some food items!